New Publications

Antipodean Antiquities Published

Now Available

Antipodean Antiquities: Classical Reception Down Under, edited by Marguerite Johnson (Bloomsbury 2019).

About the Book

Leading and emerging, early career scholars in Classical Reception Studies come together in this volume to explore the under-represented area of the Australasian Classical Tradition. They interrogate the interactions between Mediterranean Antiquity and the antipodean worlds of New Zealand and Australia through the lenses of literature, film, theatre and fine art.

Of interest to scholars across the globe who research the influence of antiquity on modern literature, film, theatre and fine art, this volume fills a decisive gap in the literature by bringing antipodean research into the spotlight. Following a contextual introduction to the field, the six parts of the volume explore the latest research on subjects that range from the Lord of the Rings and Xena: Warrior Princess franchises to important artists such as Sidney Nolan and local authors whose work offers opportunities for cross-cultural and interdisciplinary analysis with well-known Western authors and artists.

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Book Launch

We hope you can join us for the launch of Colonialism and Male Domestic Service across the Asia Pacific by Julia Martínez, Claire Lowrie, Frances Steel and Victoria Haskins (Bloomsbury 2019). The book will be launched by Professor Penny Russell at the University of Sydney on 18 February from 5 pm to 6 pm (Refectory Room H113). Light refreshments will be served. For more details and to RSVP please click here.

About the book:

Examining the role of Asian and indigenous male servants across the Asia Pacific from the late-19th century to the 1930s, this study shows how their ubiquitous presence in these purportedly 'humble' jobs gave them a degree of cultural influence that has been largely overlooked in the literature on labour mobility in the age of empire.

With case studies from British Hong Kong, Singapore, Northern Australia, Fiji and British Columbia, French Indochina, the American Philippines and the Dutch East Indies, the book delves into the intimate and often conflicted relationships between European and American colonists and their servants. It explores the lives of 'houseboys', cooks and gardeners in the colonial home, considers the bell-boys and waiters in the grand colonial hotels, and follows the stewards and cabin-boys on steamships travelling across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. This broad conception of service allows Colonialism and Male Domestic Service to illuminate trans-colonial or cross-border influences through the mobility of servants and their employers.

This path-breaking study is an important book for students and scholars of colonialism, labour history and the Asia Pacific region.

Wine Studies Book Launch

Researchers uncover true stories of Vines, Wine and Identity in the Hunter Valley

A new book examining the history and personalities of the Hunter Valley wine community will be launched at Newcastle Museum on 22 September. Further details can be found here.

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Hunter Wine: A History is one of the outputs of a four-year research project Vines, Wine and Identity: Hunter Valley NSW and Changing Australian Taste, a world first collaboration between a university, the peak wine body for a region and the cultural sector. The University of Newcastle project team is renowned sociologist Professor John Germov and Australia’s foremost wine historian Dr Julie McIntyre, a member of the Centre for 21stCentury Humanities.

“This is an important Australian wine book that uncovers new truths, challenges old myths and moves at a cracking pace with a delicious wine tale just right for the present”, said Melbourne-based wine journalist Jeni Port.

Professor Germov and Dr McIntyre will launch the book on 22 September surrounded by an exhibition, currently on display at the Newcastle Museum until Sunday 14 October, which brings to life the early years of the Hunter Valley tied to colonial, national and global themes, as featured in the book. The book launch will be accompanied by the screening of a forgotten Australian film, Squeeze a Flower. This made-for-TV movie has scenes shot at Pokolbin in the Hunter wine region in the late 1960s, and stars famous Australian and international actors.

The book and exhibition both trace through six generations of wine producers in the Hunter Valley, from when the first vines were planted in 1828 to the changing tastes and rising interest in wine of the 1980s, introducing the reader and viewer to the changing historical conditions and many personalities that helped shaped the region.