Wine Studies Book Launch

Researchers uncover true stories of Vines, Wine and Identity in the Hunter Valley

A new book examining the history and personalities of the Hunter Valley wine community will be launched at Newcastle Museum on 22 September. Further details can be found here.

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Hunter Wine: A History is one of the outputs of a four-year research project Vines, Wine and Identity: Hunter Valley NSW and Changing Australian Taste, a world first collaboration between a university, the peak wine body for a region and the cultural sector. The University of Newcastle project team is renowned sociologist Professor John Germov and Australia’s foremost wine historian Dr Julie McIntyre, a member of the Centre for 21stCentury Humanities.

“This is an important Australian wine book that uncovers new truths, challenges old myths and moves at a cracking pace with a delicious wine tale just right for the present”, said Melbourne-based wine journalist Jeni Port.

Professor Germov and Dr McIntyre will launch the book on 22 September surrounded by an exhibition, currently on display at the Newcastle Museum until Sunday 14 October, which brings to life the early years of the Hunter Valley tied to colonial, national and global themes, as featured in the book. The book launch will be accompanied by the screening of a forgotten Australian film, Squeeze a Flower. This made-for-TV movie has scenes shot at Pokolbin in the Hunter wine region in the late 1960s, and stars famous Australian and international actors.

The book and exhibition both trace through six generations of wine producers in the Hunter Valley, from when the first vines were planted in 1828 to the changing tastes and rising interest in wine of the 1980s, introducing the reader and viewer to the changing historical conditions and many personalities that helped shaped the region.