Public Lectures

Newcastle Writers Festival 2019

HCCI’s James Bennett, Nancy Cushing, Marguerite Johnson and Julie McIntyre will be speaking at this year’s Newcastle Writers Festival, 5-7 April.

NWF is one of the city’s premier cultural events and an important community partnership of the University of Newcastle. Further details on the entire program can be found at NWF’s website here.

Friday 5 April

Masterclass | Memory and Monuments with Nancy Cushing, Stephen Gapps and Tamson Pietsch. Hosted by Richard Neville. The impulse to memorialise people and events has led to the establishment of a range of monuments in urban landscapes. Increasingly, monuments have been verbally or physically attacked and, in some cases, removed. This masterclass will focus on the ongoing histories of monuments, testing the implications of preservation and removal, and how memorials can be revived, reinterpreted or replaced. The three speakers will address Captain Cook, counter-memorials and the ‘statue wars’; the memorial to the band on the Titanic in Broken Hill; and the coal monument in Newcastle.

  • 11.00am-1.00pm

  • Level 3, Room X321 NeW Space, Hunter St Free event

  • Limited to 50 places

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Saturday 6 April

NEW Thinking Series | Lives Erased: The History of LGBTQI Conversion Therapy with James Bennett, Stuart Edser and Anthony Venn-Brown. Hosted by Marguerite Johnson.

  • 11.30am-12.30pm 

  • Cummings Room, City Hall 

  • Free session

NEW Thinking Series | A New Taste of Hunter Wine History with John Germov and Julie McIntyre. Hosted by Cassie McCullagh.

  • 1:30-2:30pm

  • Cummings Room, City Hall

  • Free Session

War Experience Public Lectures

This year’s War Experience Public Lecture series has now been announced for the following dates in semester one. Lectures are scheduled on Tuesdays 7-8pm at the University of Newcastle’s City Campus, room X202. All are welcome.

  • 12th March, Caroline Schneider, Children in Genocide – Experiences of Violence and the Yazidi Case

  • 26th March, Dr Sue Wareham, The Hidden Casualty of War: The Environment

  • 9th April, Elicia Taylor, ‘Just like a letter from a personal friend’: Australian Women and Wartime Communication Channels

  • 30th April, Peter Hooker, Republics at War: The United States’ Quasi-War with France, and its Repercussions on American Identity

  • 14th May, Prof. Michael. Ondaatje, The War on Blacks in American History

  • 28th May, Mr Terry Ryan, Sex and War in Antiquity

For further information about these lectures please contact the series coordinator, Dr. Jane Bellemore: jane.bellemore@newcastle.edu.au, 02.492.15231

Australian Archaeological Institute Athens Event

The Cretan Labyrinth: Monument and Memory from Prehistory to the Present

The 2018 AAIA visiting professor is Professor Antonis Kotsonas from the University of Cincinnati.

Where: X502, NewSpace (Level 5), corner of Auckland and Hunter Streets, Newcastle

When: Monday 20 August 2018

Lecture commences at 6pm, all welcome.

Homer and the Archaeology of Crete

The relationship between the Homeric epics and archaeology has been approached through the lens of Homeric archaeology, which involved matching the epics with the archaeological record and identifying realia of Homer’s heroes. However, a range of new approaches have recently revolutionized the field. Drawing from these approaches, this seminar offers a regional and diachronic analysis of Homeric stories about Crete, an assessment of the reception of these stories by the island’s inhabitants throughout antiquity, and an account of their impact on Medieval to modern literature and art.

Presented by: Professor Antonis Kotsonas (visiting professor with the AAIA)

Where: Cultural Collections (lower ground floor), Auchmuty Library, Callaghan campus, University of Newcastle

When: Tuesday 21 August 2018

Presentation commences at 1pm for approximately an hour.

About the Presenter:

The 2018 AAIA Visiting Professor is Professor Antonis Kotsonas from the University of Cincinnati, who specialises in the material culture, socio-cultural and economic history of the Early Iron Age and the Archaic period in Greece and the Mediterranean, especially Crete, the Cyclades, Euboea and Macedonia. Before taking up his post at the University of Cincinnati, Kotsonas worked at King’s College London, the University of Crete, the University of Amsterdam and the University of Edinburgh. He has also served as a Curator of Greek Archaeology at the Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam.

Further Information:

Please contact Mr Hugh Lindsay for further information about these events. Hugh can be contacted via email or on (02) 4921 5226.